The police as the modern priest-Levite

Last weekend, I was cycling home at around 1am and was going through the East Road–Newmarket Road–Elizabeth Way roundabout, when I went past a woman who looked like she was waiting for a lift. However, the side of a major road away from any houses seemed like an odd place to wait for a lift, and she seemed distressed, so I stopped and asked if she was okay.

She was not okay. She was not waiting for a lift. She had been walking around Cambridge, lost, for the last two and a half hours. She was from a different city, having been on a hen night, having split off from the rest of the group, and trying to find her way back to the Travelodge. Her phone battery had run out. She was dressed up for going out; her shoes were not suitable for that much walking, and the cold weather was becoming increasingly unpleasant. (As it happened, the Travelodge was just down the road, about two minutes’ walk away.)

She was grateful, and told me that she had tried to stop and ask multiple people for directions, eliciting only ‘I don’t know, sorry’, rudeness, or abuse. Most horrifyingly, she had approached police officers for help and directions, but the police refused to help her, on the grounds that she was not a victim of a crime and therefore not in trouble.

Is their job to uphold the Law and to stop crime, or to serve the public and keep them safe?

Reporting biases in Genesis and Andrew Lloyd Webber

It’s always bugged me how in Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Pharaoh hires Joseph rather arbitrarily to be his Vizier responsible for Egypt’s economic policies over the next fourteen years, based solely on Joseph’s (as yet unproven) ability to explain his dreams. Even if Joseph’s forecasting was accurate, as a lowly foreign-born slave-turn-prisoner would he have had the administrative skills to oversee such huge reforms?

Then, I realised: Assuming that Egypt had existed for centuries before the time of Joseph, then successive Pharaohs might have appointed lots of people to be Viziers in this way, based solely on their abilities to make predictions based on individual dreams. Those who turned out to be wrong, or who were unable to enact the appropriate policies, were disposed of and their stories were not recorded and have not been passed down to us.