Using Matrix instant messaging

Following my recent rant on decentralising our communications, I’ve started trying out the Matrix communication protocol on the suggestion of a friend. It’s a wonderful idea, and it’s great that the network can be connected to by various different clients. And it seems to be very easy to add people to the network: you just need to give their email address(*) to invite them. The Riot.im is quite easy to use for basic usage, although there are some nuances that I haven’t got used to yet.

One thing that’s not immediately obvious is how you refer to things. On Twitter, you can refer to people as @jftsang and to groups as #example. On IRC networks, channels are usually called #channel or ##unofficialchannel.

Well, on Matrix, user IDs take the form @username:server, such as @jftsang:matrix.org. The latter part tells you about the homeserver of the user, which is needed because Matrix is a distributed network and different users might be accessing through different servers. Rooms take the form #room:server, and communities take the form +room:server. I’m not yet sure what the relationship between rooms and communities is.

(*) Ten years of relying almost exclusively on Facebook means that we tend not to have many of our friends’ email addresses. The situation was particularly bad when Facebook tried pushing their @facebook.com email addresses, which fortunately didn’t catch on.

I would recommend anyone interested in a free-as-in-speech-and-as-in-beer IM service to try this out; send me a message on @jftsang:matrix.org on Matrix, or giving me your email address so that I may invite you.

Explaining my PhD using the ten hundred most used words

You can try this yourself at http://splasho.com/upgoer5/.

In my work I look at cups full of hundreds of hundreds of hundreds of hundreds of tiny little bits, such as little glass balls, or the hard white stuff that you can put on your food. When you try to move these bodies made up of little bits, such as when you move them from one cup to another, they act a little bit like water but not quite in the same way. We understand how water moves from one cup to another quite well, but it’s much harder when you have these little bits because they can do a lot of different things that water can’t do. It’s also harder to learn about how these little bits move because they are usually not see-through, so that you can’t look inside the body and see how it’s moving under the top.

I want to understand how these bodies made up of tiny little bits move when you make them go over things. It’s hard to try it out in real life because the bits are not see-through, so instead I use a computer where I can play with pretend tiny little bits. This lets me look at how each little bit moves. It’s also much cleaner to do it on the computer and I can try many different set-ups at the same time, but you have to make sure that the pretend little bits are like real ones.

It’s important to study how stuff made up of tiny little bits go over things, because sometimes too much of this stuff can move at the same time, very quickly, over houses. This happens quite often and a lot of people get hurt. It’s also interesting because people also use a lot of this stuff to build things and we need to know what’s the best way of moving it.

The LaTeX psalm chant

LaTeX’s output, showing its hyphenation algorithms at work, makes me want to set my bibliography to plainchant:


[19] [20] [21] (./blasius.bbl
Underfull \hbox (badness 1210) in paragraph at lines 13--15
[]\OT1/cmr/m/sc/9 Andreotti, Bruno, Forterre, Yo[]el & Pouliquen, Oliver \OT1/c
mr/m/n/9 2013 \OT1/cmr/m/it/9 Gran-u-lar Me-dia\OT1/cmr/m/n/9 .
[22]
Underfull \hbox (badness 6396) in paragraph at lines 156--158
[]\OT1/cmr/m/sc/9 Peregrine, D. H. \OT1/cmr/m/n/9 1967 Long waves on a beach. \
OT1/cmr/m/it/9 Jour-nal of Fluid Me-chan-ics

Underfull \hbox (badness 5954) in paragraph at lines 180--184
[]\OT1/cmr/m/sc/9 Rajchenbach, Jean \OT1/cmr/m/n/9 2005 Rhe-ol-ogy of dense gra
n-u-lar ma-te-ri-als: steady, uni-form

Underfull \hbox (badness 10000) in paragraph at lines 180--184
\OT1/cmr/m/n/9 flow and the avalanche regime. \OT1/cmr/m/it/9 Jour-nal of Physi
cs: Con-densed Mat-ter
[23]) [24] (./blasius.aux)

Free speech and free beer

Facebook is in the news in both the UK and the USA for its dealings with Cambridge Analytica, in which Facebook users’ personal information was handed over to the political consultancy firm. There are a couple of problems with the way this is being reported in the media.

  • We, as mere users of Facebook, are not Facebook’s customers. We are its products. We refer to Facebook as a ‘service’ because we tend to think of it in much the same way as we think of the fire service, the armed forces or the NHS. But of these four things, only one of them is privately owned and largely unregulated.
  • This was not a data breach, it was a data leak if not a data transfer.
  • I haven’t read Facebook’s terms of use in any detail recently, but its almost certain that they permit this sort of data transfer to third parties (or at least does not specifically forbid them). It’s not a secret.
  • Even if it were a secret, it should be unsurprising. The selling of personal information is Facebook’s business model, which should be surprising to nobody. What do you think is paying for the upkeep costs of a website serving billions of people each day, doing so at zero price?
  • Although the #deletefacebook and #boycottfacebook campaigns are currently enjoying a surge in popularity and have the backing of prominent figures, they won’t result in immediate or significant change: I have said before that Facebook holds a monopoly on communication. This is exemplified by the fact that these campaigns are taking place, to a large extent, on Facebook.
  • Moreover, if we all migrate to a new social network (just as we have all left MySpace and Bebo), then the new company would be just as abusive towards its users. In any case, there is currently no centralised, zero-priced website that offers all of the things that Facebook offers its users: a soapbox, an address book, a calendar and an instant messaging service. Nor is there likely to be such a website in the future. This is a matter of economics; the ‘market’ for social networking websites admits natural monopolies.
  • As much as Brexit and Trump are regrettable, the fact that Cambridge Analytica was behind the two campaigns, helping to spread fake news and influencing the two votes to a strong degree, is a distraction. The real danger is our willingness to sign up to such a website in the first place.

For users of social networks, the only long-lasting solution is to break away from the centralised model and start using decentralised models, such as diaspora*. For instant messaging, using something like IRC would be a good first step towards decentralisation. As for having a soapbox, I run my own website (which you are reading now), because I want to have ownership and control over what I write. I have the freedom to amend or retract my content without the information being held in perpetuity by another party. I can make content accessible to a select group of friends without it also being accessible to any third parties (provided that I trust my friends, which by definition I do). Setting up one’s own website is not technically challenging, if one is happy to pay a monthly fee in exchange.

In summary,

‘Free as in beer’ implies ‘not free as in speech’.

That means you can’t expect to have a social network (or any other ‘service’) that does not charge you and yet entirely respects your digital rights.